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After Samacchini, Orazio (Italian painter, 1532-1577) , The Stoning of St Stephen

Core Record

Title The Stoning of St Stephen
Collection Wellcome Library
Artist After Samacchini, Orazio (Italian painter, 1532-1577)
Attributed to manner of Vasari, Giorgio (Italian painter, architect, and writer, 1511-1574)
Previously attributed to Signorelli, Luca (Italian painter and draftsman, ca. 1450-1523)
Date Earliest about 1550
Date Latest 1850
Description St Stephen was the first Christian martyr. He was preaching the Gospel in the streets when angry Jews who believed his message to be blasphemy, dragged him outside the city, and stoned him to death. It is his stoning that is recorded in this painting. This painting is a copy of a work attributed to the Italian sixteenth-century painter, Orazio Samacchini. He was a Mannerist painter, close in style to Gulio Romano. The work was engraved by the Flemish engraver Cornelis Cort (1530-1578).
Current Accession Number 44803i
Former Accession Number P 1403/1938
Subject figure; religion (Stoning of St Stephen); townscape
Measurements 44.0 x 35 cm.0 cm (estimate)
Material oil on canvas (laid on board)
Acquisition Details Bequeathed by Henry Solomon Wellcome 1936.
Provenance Duca di Modena, Novellara; Mme Eid (;); in the collection of Robert Norman by 1930; Sale, Foster's, London, 22 October 1930, lot 100 as by 'L. Signorelli', 5 gns; in the collection of Henry Solomon Wellcome, October 1922.
Notes Writing on the reverse of the painting records that the painting was in the collection of the Duke of Modena. Novellara. In the late seventeenth century, the Duca di Modena was from the d' Este family. Novellara is in the region of Reggio Emilia in Italy. The inscriptions '114 S' & '114NJ' appear on the reverse. David Jaffe suggested that the work is after Vasari. No engraving was found by Cornelis Cort (1530-1578). It is not known which 'Robert Norman' was the owner. Cort is best known for his engraved works by Titian. He also did Descent from the Cross by Rogier van der Weyden. Cort was primarily concerned with Italianate subjects.
Rights Owner (c) The Wellcome Trust
Author Dr Madeleine Korn
 

 

 

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