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Title Freiwillige aller Waffen - Sichert Berlin - Tretet ein in die Brigade Reinhard [Volunteers of All Services - Safeguard Berlin - Enlist in the Reinhard Brigade]
Collection Imperial War Museum: Posters of Conflict - The Visual Culture of Public Information and Counter Information
Artist Stockmann, Helmuth
Printer Plakatkunstanstalt Dinse und Eckert, Berlin SO16
Publisher/Sponsor Freiwillige Brigade Reinhard
Concept recruiting, military personnel, militia, inter-war, historical reference, fire / fire fighting, emblems, uniform
Description whole: the image occupies the upper three-quarters, set against a white background. The title and text are separate and positioned in the lower quarter, in white, and set against a black background.
image: a full-length depiction of a 'Freikorps' soldier using a shield decorated with a letter 'R' to protect himself from stylised orange flames. He holds a sword in his right hand.
text: HELMUTH STOCKMANN
FREIWILLIGE ALLER WAFFEN SICHERT BERLIN
TRETET EIN IN DIE BRIGADE REINHARD
WERBEBÜRO. MOABIT. NEUES KRIMINALGERICHT
TURMSTR 91
PLAKATKUNSTANSTALT DINSE UND ECKERT BERLIN S.O. 16
[Volunteers of all services, safeguard Berlin. Enlist in the Reinhard Brigade. Recruiting Office. Moabit. New Criminal Justice Court [address]. Dinse and Eckert Poster Art Office [address].]
Object shield, sword, helmet
Id Number Current Accession IWM PST 7792
Location Creation Site Germany
Measurements Dimensions 950 mm x 711 mm
Event postWW1 Germany 1919-38
Related Country Germany (pre 1945 and post 1990) DE
Contextual Notes The 'Freikorps' were formed in Germany in late 1918 predominantly recruiting from unsettled, often disaffected, First World War army veterans. They were also joined by students and adventure-seekers with right-wing, nationalist tendencies.
Acting as an auxiliary police force they were assigned to maintain order by the new post-war republican government in Germany. Yet, many units proved little more than violent private armies, answerable to none but their commanders as they sought to crush communist-inspired civil unrest. Nevertheless the ruling SDP viewed them as a necessary evil and ordered them to suppress left-wing insurrection in Berlin, the Ruhr and Munich, as well as to fight in the disputed territory of Upper Silesia.
The more moderate units were eventually merged into the newly formed 'Reichswehr' in 1920. Whereas radical elements went underground, with some taking part in the Nazi party's 'Munich Putsch' of 1923. Although the failure of the coup brought an end to the 'Freikorps' units, many of its members formed 'Sturm Abteilung' (SA) to serve under the Nazi's. Others joined veteran's organisations, such as 'Stahlhelm'.
Text Language German
Rights Every effort has been made to trace copyright holders and gain permission for use of the images within this collection. We would be grateful for any information concerning copyright and will withdraw images immediately on copyright holder’s request.
Style Period Period 1919-1938
Work Type poster
 

 

 

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