VADS Blog

Student publication by Glasgow’s leading artists launched online

A student publication by Charles Rennie Mackintosh and his contemporaries at the Glasgow School of Art is now available online via VADS at: http://www.vads.ac.uk/collections/GSAMAG

A Pond, November 1894 by Frances Elizabeth Macdonald
A Pond, November 1894 by Frances Elizabeth Macdonald

The Magazine is an illustrated handwritten journal which was circulated among a group of friends who were associated with the Glasgow School of Art in the early 1890s, including Charles Rennie Mackintosh, his future wife Margaret Macdonald and her sister Frances. Its four volumes contain 33 textual pieces of which 14 are poems, and 104 illustrations ranging from pen and ink drawings, to watercolours, photographs, photogravures and etchings, many produced by significant artists at the beginning of their careers.

In 2009 the School’s Charles Rennie Mackintosh collection was named as a Recognised Collection of National Significance by Museums Galleries Scotland (MGS) and in 2010 received £36,988 in Recognition grant funding from MGS for its Magazine project. This important award allowed for the full conservation of The Magazine, and the digitisation of all four volumes.

[Frontispiece], Spring 1896 by Agnes Raeburn
[Frontispiece], Spring 1896 by Agnes Raeburn

VADS has been hosted online for over 15 years by the University for the Creative Arts (UCA), a specialist art and design university in the south of England. VADS provides online access to a growing collection of over 120,000 art and design images contributed by universities, libraries, museums and archives from across the UK, which can be used freely for educational purposes. To explore all the VADS collections, visit: http://www.vads.ac.uk/collections

Over 1000 NICE Paintings now online

The Visual Arts Data Service (VADS) and the University of Glasgow are pleased to announce the launch of over 1000 newly researched paintings from leading national and regional collections as part of the National Inventory of Continental European Paintings (NICE Paintings) at: http://www.vads.ac.uk/collections/NIRP

Jockeys before the race, by Edgar Degas, 1878-9, The Barber Institute of Fine Arts, Birmingham
Jockeys before the race, by Edgar Degas, 1878-9, The Barber Institute of Fine Arts, Birmingham

NICE Paintings is a unique online inventory that gives access to newly researched information and digital images for over 9000 pre-1900 European paintings in UK public collections. The database was created in 2007 by the National Inventory Research Project (NIRP) based at the University of Glasgow. It has been made available online for free educational use in collaboration with VADS at the University for the Creative Arts (UCA).

A Lady Taking Tea, by Jean-Simeon Chardin, 1735, Hunterian Art Gallery, University of Glasgow
A Lady Taking Tea, by Jean-Siméon Chardin, 1735, Hunterian Art Gallery, University of Glasgow

The latest images include over 940 paintings from the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A), Apsley House, and the Royal Academy of Art, London, and are the outcome of a project funded by the Kress Foundation. It also includes a further 210 records and images resulting from work at the Barber Institute, University of Birmingham, carried out by the Neil MacGregor Exhibition and Collections Research Scholar, and at the Hunterian Art Gallery, University of Glasgow.

This latest addition include works by many of the most famous and revered artists of all time such as Degas, van Dyck, Gauguin, Manet, Monet, Pissarro, Poussin, Rembrandt, Renoir, Rubens, and Toulouse-Lautrec, to name just a few.

Portrait of Francois Langlois, by Anthony van Dyck, 1634-7, The Barber Institute of Fine Arts, Birmingham
Portrait of François Langlois, by Anthony van Dyck, 1634-7, The Barber Institute of Fine Arts, Birmingham

A current exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum, Research on Paintings: Technical Art History and Connoisseurship (till 22 September 2013), highlights 11 of the most interesting discoveries made during NIRP research on the old master paintings in their collection. Over the two years’ research 200 of the Museum’s paintings were re-attributed or re-identified, notably a previously unidentified work by the great Venetian artist Tintoretto, which is now know to be part of a set of three paintings depicting scenes from the legend of St Helena and the Holy Cross. Other important paintings have been newly and firmly attributed to Fuseli, Boucher and Snyders.

Andrew Greg, Director of the National Inventory Research Project at the University of Glasgow, says “we have been delighted to have been able to work over the years with so many hard-pressed curators and help them research and publicize their collections. We are continuing to seek funding to continue this valuable work. The project also creates links between academic art historians and museums and has helped many talented young researchers obtain curatorial posts in prestigious museums.”

 

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